Saeed ‘ji’ Hafeez ‘Sahib’ And Modi ‘Chor’

PUBLIC MEMORY, JOURNALISM students are being told for decades, is phenomenally short
I myself unthinkingly reiterated this in a whole decade as a contributory lecturer in a post-graduate Department of Mass Communications, sometimes adding that the only memory shorter than that, perhaps, was that of sub-editors.

It is no wonder that none of the reports I had seen, both in print and on electronic media, about the controversy over the Congress party President, Rahul Gandhi, adding the honorific ‘ji’ to the name of anti-India terrorist Hafiz Sayeed, recalled how  width= the same terrorist was similarly honoured by the Congress earlier.

In 2013, the Home Minister of the Congress-led UPA government, Susheel Kumar Shinde, used ‘Ji’ and ‘sahib’ while referring to the Pakistan-backed terrorist. A huge furor
was raised about it in the Lok Sabha then, with several Bharatiya Janata Party MPs demanding that Shinde, be sacked.

Many Congress dynasty devotees felt the honorifics could just be the result of the cultured and refined speaking habits of their leaders.

It was not only the reverential reference to Hafiz Sayeed, now repeated by Rahul himself, which irritated the BJP. The Congress had parroted umpteen times that there was nothing called Islamic terrorism and that all terrorists were just criminals. Fine. It was a mere coincidence that almost all the terrorists were Muslims and the acts were done in the name of Islam and the Prophet who preached love and peace.

In the same breath, however, Shinde and Finance Minister P. Chidambaram, one of the few ‘think-tanks’ in the Congress (most others have left all thinking to the Gandhi dynasty) talked of Hindu and saffron terrorism. In spite of American intelligence, better equipped in Pakistan, telling that the blasts in the Samjautha Express and a masjid in India were the handiwork of Islamic terrorists, they tried their best to blame RSS and some Hindu leaders for the same – till the courts acquitted them after years of incarceration.

The same Congress leaders, however, called Prime Minister Narendra Modi a low-born (neech) tea-seller (chaiwala), uneducated and uncouth (anpadh, Gavaar), lier and theif (chor).

It is not known where their cultured refinement of speech had done then. Perhaps it was drowned in the loud guffaws (ha ha
ha) of Renuka Choudhary, the one leader who, when she was in Telugu Desam of after defection to Congress, was never known for use of soft or refined words.

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Money, Muscle, Caste Cast Votes

Courtesy: Santabanta.com

FORMER CHIEF ELECTION Commissioner T.S. Krishnamurthy has said that the upcoming elections to the Lok Sabha will be marked by money power, violence and hatred’.

He is quoted in the media as saying that “every conceivable complication will take place because of the way the political parties are fighting. This, he said, makes the implementation of the model code of conduct as big challenge to the Election Commission.

Today a friend sent me a message (in Kannada) which says: Price of a buffalo – Rs,80,000, Bull – Rs 50,000, Goat – Rs,10,000, Dog of a good breed – Rs 5000 to 6000 and Pig – Rs. 3000 to 5000. The price of a man who sells himself (his vote) is only Rs.500 to 1000, the post adds.

Earlier there was a story about a politician who offered Rs.500 for a vote to a man who said he would, instead, have a donkey. The politician went searching for a donkey and found that the minimum price demanded was Rs.2000. So he went back to the voter and said he could not get a donkey cheap; instead, he offered to pay Rs.1000 for the vote.

“So, I cost less than a donkey?” the voter asked.

Yes, the donkeys who vote for other donkeys for money, under threats of musclemen, because the candidate belongs to his/her caste or religion definitely are very cheap, We get donkeys or puppies to rule us. And even then there is donkey trading which the media calls “horse” trading and anyone who buys the largest number of donkeys becomes the ruler.

In a “progressive” state of India, the Chief Ministership went to the party which secured the LEAST number of seats and the party which secured the highest number (though a little short of a majority) sits in the Opposition.

India, it must be admitted proudly, has a democracy – unlike most of the newly independent and most Muslim countries. But almost 72 years of independence has not helped us evolve a healthy political culture in which voting is done on programmes and policies, NOT caste or religion, money, muscle power and vote-bank politics of sheepish voting to whoever the ‘mukhia’ (chieftain) asks you to vote.

And the party which ruled the longest, the Indian National Congress, has to bear a large portion of the blame for this. The Bharatiya Janata Party, which once boasted of being a party with a difference, a party of principles, seems to have fallen in line with the dynasty-ruled Congress and seems to value electoral victories more than principles. The party whose leader, the late Atal Bihari Vajpayee once showed a bipartisan attitude and described his rival, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi as ‘Durga” for the courage shown in liberating Bangladesh, is now accused of taking credit for action against Pakistan for terrorism and even of ‘faking’ the Pulwama terrorist attack killing 44 of its Jawans, for electoral gains.

Bipartisanism has lost the poll to “electoral compulsions.” Perhaps we deserve only to be ruled by a dynasty or its puppies.

WhatsApp: Bhakts Clash With Dynasty Devotees

EVERYONE IS ON a WhatsApp group today, unless he/she is in coma, cut off from the world or absultey unique.

The number of people who send a ‘Good Morning’ and ‘Goodnight’ message (or several of them) every day on their smartphones in India,despite its high illitracy, is astounding, as is that of users forwarding, without checking or even reading often, what they receive.

No wonder, therefore, that Indians are among those using this messaging app most. Facebook, which owns the app, had to set some special terms, like ‘ only five forwards’ for India and later extend them to other countries.

It was made necessary because the unthinking forwards led to dangerous situatiins like lynching due to fake mesages of child-lifting reaching thousands of people within seconds.

Fake news and provocative messages creating law and order problems spread faster than wid fire. Millions of people get addicted to watching their phones. Once used to read WA posts every few minutes, they spend hours on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or YouTube, equally addictive.

This causes not only a huge loss of productivity but also reduces actual human contact and face-to-face communication. Another problem arising from it is war of words between those in a groupk who belong to rival idrologies.

Some feel that Prime Minister Narendra Modi is under attack from ‘Dynasty Devotees’ who want the return of Rahul and his dynasty to power. The DDs call them Modi Bhakts (worshippers). Both sides feel the other side has paid people doing the messagung.

Though some of the posts do seem to be created by the IT Cells of the BJP and the Congress, most are posted by people who strongly feel on issues. Some posts, especially those attacking the other religions, are the handiwork of fanatics/fundamentalists wanting to fan social tensions and even riots.

It is true that Modi, supposed to be more orthodox and backward, as an RSS fulltimer, than the ‘young, foreign educated and secular’ Rahul Gandhi, used the electronic media and technology more erffectively than Rahul initially, but soon the Congress caught up.

Intervening in a raging war of words between two members if a family group, with both quitting the grouo repeatedly in protest (to be added back by the group admin) I had to tell them to refrain from political posts and stuck to family issues.

People have a right to believe that only the Indira dynasty can rule India and that religion can be used for votebank politics or that anyone who talks of nationalism is communal.

Similarly others can not call them psudosecular and say most Muslims stayed back in India after partition not because they were secular but for their property, posts and to make India an Islamic country.

One group can’t question the other or say that everyone here must owe allegiance to this country first and be patriotic.

So no political posts on family or professional groups. One can post them directly to to others who agree with the ideology.

Group admins, held responsible and even arrested for offensive posts, should ensure that politics are to be discussed only on griups that are meant for it.

And people should live here, not on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

Too Many Caged Birds: Police, CBI, Probe Panels

Rajeev Kumar IPS: CBI’s target

MUCH NOISE has been made on the issue of CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation) going to the residence of Kolkata police chief Rajeev Kumar, IPS, to question him about alleged dilution of cases against ruling Trinamool Congress (TMC) leaders involved in Ponzi schemes in which thousands of people were defrauded of millions of rupees.

West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee (‘Didi’ for all) sat in Dharna (protest squat) with Kumar to support him. Eight years ago, she accused him of snooping on opposition leaders!

Most political leaders decried the ponzi (chit fund) schemes. Many citizens, mostly the poor who wanted to get rich, were cheated.

The critics included Rahul Gandhi, now President of the Congress. He now supports Didi, in a U-turn, as Didi backs ‘mahagut(ter)bandhan’, the anti-BJP grand alliance that may make Rahul the next PM.

The Supreme Court first warned the police chief against destroying evidence and then the CBI against arresting him. Now it said he can be interrogated at Shillong. Both Didi and BJP claim they won!

From what appeared in the media, the CBI only wanted to question him. The big drama put up by Didi led to suspicion that Kumar knew too many of Mamata’s secrets or of her support to the fraudsters.

It is widely believed that police dilute cases to ensure that those with clout, especially political, are acquitted by courts. Often such cases are dragged for decades by police

Such people, like the Congress MLA of Karnataka who tried to kill another, become ‘untraceable’ even if they are in a minister’s house or sit in a police station.

CBI has questioned George Fernandes, Narendra Modi and Amit Shah under Congress control very peacefully and found nothing to indict them. These mahagath- bandhan screechers are like terrified chicken when the CBI goes near them. Wonder why?,Jaya Jaitly a close associate if Fernandes, who died recently, said in a Tweet.

The SC had dubbed CBI a caged bird (perhaps during UPA rule?) It is astounding how many state agencies — like intelligence agencies, police, inquiry commissions and even lower judiciary — are caged birds.

So many probe panel reports have concluded just what the ruling party wanted, that one suspects the report is written in advance and only those who endorse it are named to head the panel, which only buys time or hides the issue under the carpet.

It is time an independent agency free from political influence is set up. Three US Presidents, Nixon. Clinton and Trump have been cornered by such an agency.

Caging birds is cruel. It is time they are set free.

© Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved

Great But Unknown Books

(Reblogging post of Sept.2, 2018)

Eliza_Gaskell
Elizabeth C. Gaskell

THE SOCRATIC concept of true knowledge is the ability to know how little one knows. The world’s greatest scientist, Newton compared all known knowledge to one grain of sand on a beach. These equally apply to books: Those who are regarded as well-read or voracious readers know that they had read a microscopic fraction of all the good books written – even in one genre. And some great books are forgotten and remain almost unknown.

One lifetime is not enough to read all the works (including the critical analyses and interpretations) of the books of only Shakespeare in English or of Kalidasa in Sanskrit.

That was, perhaps, how the sarcastic adage that “Classics are books everyone knows about, but no one reads” came into being. But, though unread, classics are known.

Millions of people go through their entire lives without reading a single book (except class books mugged up to pass exams) and talk derisively of ‘bookish knowledge’ or proud of learning from life as ‘graduates of the school of knocks.’ A few authors are known for one or two of their books but many of their works are lost in history,

Will Durant, the American author and philosopher, is famous for his classic ‘ The Story of Civilisation’. How many know of his ‘The Case for India’? The book moved me so much that I felt the government should have bought millions of its copies to distribute them free to anyone who can read English. Another of his books, Our Oriental Heritage also would have made India proud.

I once toyed with the idea of pirating ‘The Case for India’ and distributing it free to thousands or making it a free e-book.

Some very good books are forgotten and stay unknown, hidden under the dust of history. I (and perhaps most readers) had not heard of Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, a contemporary of the great Charles Dickens in the mid-1800s.I would never have known about her if I was not listening to an audiobook of D.H. Lawrence, found it boring and moved on to readers’ comments. One of them said Gaskell’s ‘Mary Barton’ was much more interesting. I had not even heard of her and downloaded that audio book.

Besides ‘Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life” she also wrote A Dark Night’s Work, The Grey Woman, The Life of Charlotte Bronte. My Lady Ludlow, Round the Sofa, North and South, Mr Harrison’s Confession, Wives and Daughters, Ruth, Cousin Phillis, Cranford and the Cage at Cranford, The Moorland Cottage, Sylvia’s Lover and The Pastor’s Wife.

All these books are available on the free audiobook site, Librivox. I would not have known about the book had I not discovered, due to the fear of impending blindness, audiobook sites (I subscribe to several such sites) and Librivox, a site which has most books whose copyright had expired, enabling them to be put ‘in public domain’ with the help of volunteers who read them. Librivox also has an e-book version GuteBooks for those who can read on screen.

ALL the books by Gaskell have received 4, 4.5 or 5-star (out of 5) ratings from the listeners. Some books are available in more than one version, read by a different person.

Here is a writer-up on the book by Martin Geeson, on the Librivox site:

Mary Barton was Elizabeth Gaskell’s first full-length novel. It was published anonymously in that tumultuous year of political change, 1848 – only a few months after the Communist Manifesto co-authored by her fellow Manchester-resident, Friedrich Engels. Engels’s experience as agent in his father’s cotton-spinning factory motivated him to write “The Condition of the Working Class in England”, a classic account of the sufferings of the poor under the factory-system.

Elizabeth Gaskell’s own personal contact with the plight of the poor cotton workers of Lancashire also compelled her to a compassionate examination of their lives; but as a middle-class woman, married to an Unitarian minister, her approach to her subject took on a more emotionally complex significance; influenced by religious faith but also by more personal considerations. In the brief preface to the novel, Mrs Gaskell hints at her initial impulse. The loss of a beloved child in infancy led her to seek a therapeutic outlet, but one which left her uncertain of her capacity to contextualize her public, writerly response to the tragedies occurring in the surrounding society of Manchester’s poorest classes:
“I know nothing of Political Economy, or the theories of trade…” She was, however, determined to portray, in novelistic form, the intimate connection between the private experience of her characters and the social forces of her time. The success of the novel led her to proclaim her authorship and move on to further works of fiction, which have secured her in our times a mounting reputation as one of the leading novelists of the mid-Victorian period.
Certainly, the novel features numerous death-scenes, all conveyed with a depth of sympathy that contrasts with the queasy iambics with which Dickens orchestrated the notorious demise of Little Nell. Mrs Gaskell was not, like Dickens, a London-based novelist observing the sufferings of the provincial poor with a journalistic detachment – as evidenced in his own admirable, Lancashire-based novel “Hard Times”. Gaskell lived among the people whose attenuated lives she chronicled – and however hesitantly, as a début novelist, she rendered their experience in literary terms, her writing presents us with a true insight into the sufferings of individuals at a point in history when the mass of human beings fell casualty to the forms of economic progress following upon the Industrial Revolution. Most impressively she called into question the political and social cost of creating a resentful proletariat despairing of survival in (to quote Karl Marx) a “heartless world”.
Our reader Tony Foster is a resident of Manchester and a near-neighbour of Mrs Gaskell (allowing for their separation in time). His superb narration renders the native speech of her characters with an authenticity which ideally conveys the spirit of this book. A truly moving experience awaits everyone who gives ear to this ‘Tale of Manchester Life’.

Much has been written about India’s poverty and books or films (like Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali) which portray it have a big market (and win awards) in the West where the common man still thinks Indians live on trees. But the picture of utter poverty of the working class in 19th century England is startling.

Most of the readers must have read Mulk Raj Anand’s classic ‘The Untouchable’, at least as a prescribed reading for examinations if not out of concern for an oppressed class of the country and a reflection of India’s greatest evil, the caste system.

However, in my reading for 70 years, I had not come across any mention of the Cagots of western France. Elizabeth Gaskell wrote of them in a story ‘An Accursed Race’ included in book of stories ‘Round the Sofa’. Her portrayal of the inhuman way the Cagot tribe was treated all over Europe and even by the Church is not just appalling; it shows the Indian ‘Dalits’ were not treated half as badly. The other stories expose how the aristocracy discriminated against the ‘commoners’ and even denied them education.

And yet the world knows of only the Indian untouchables and caste. The same Church used that oppression and deprivation to convert millions, adding only to its numbers without improving their social status in any way. Other religions followed the same technique besides coercion. All that came of the conversions was creation of vote banks and politics of hatred.

It is significant that fiction and literature took up the social issues of discrimination, poverty and inequality, strengthening the efforts to set right the system. Very little of such use of literature and fiction is seen in India. True some films and books did come out against economic inequality, corruption and caste system, but they were very few or executed badly. I am not aware of any literary works that exposed the crimes against Kashmiri pandits or victims of caste reservations, sexual harassment or other evils.

With smart phone usage going up day by day in India, it is time a free audio and electronic book site of Indian books comes into being. On one of the audiobook sites I borrow books from the Toronto Public Library in Canada.

Is there a single public library in India which has such a facility?

Budget Disappoints – As Usual

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Six men of Indostan To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind). –Poem by John Godfrey Saxe

BUDGET REACTIONS ARE an annual ritual. They never fail to excite and be praised by the ruling party. And the opposition is always disappointed.

The reactions, at least by some politicians, are written out in advance

According to a friend, this budget has nothing for Poor people like Lalu Prasad Yadav and his family. The former peon could only become a multimillionnaire and not as they hoped a billionaire, which is the birthright of any Yadav.

This budget has nothing for poor farmers like Robert Vadra who keep borrowing crores (of course interest free) to buy land.

It has nothing for the working middle class like P. Chidhambaram and family.

This budget has nothing for Industrialists like Mallya, who asked ONLY for fair deal and justice.

This budget has nothing for exporters like Hafeez Sayeed, who is sweating to export terror and kill hundred of innocents for the sake of Islam.

This budget has nothing for the senior citizens like HD Deve Gowda, trying very very hard to keep himself awake at meetings.

This budget has nothing for those born-rich, like Sonia Gandhi.

This budget has nothing for honest people like Kejriwal, who is honest about wanting power.

This budget has nothing for hard(ly) working people like Rahul Gandhi who has to work 24/7 to learn new words of abuse.

This budget has nothing for (eternal) students like Kannaiah Kumar who is studying hard to split India further.

Chandrababu Naidu is disappointed that no law is made to make Lokesh the next Chief Minister.

Many godmen lament that Modi has not shut down all schools, college, banks and offices to build Ram temples in every locality of the country.

Overall it is a disappointing budget!

The Miraculous Flying, Speaking, Dog

https://unstophttpspableafterseventy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/lotus.jpg

THE DOG IN the picture above is supernatural; it can speak, fly, do a grater job than any human being in any post…even the post of Indian Prime Minister for which several leaders of different partes are fighting – like dogs.

Many leaders of the Indian National Congress have been vying with each other to praise two leaders of the dynasty that rules the party, whose members alone can, according to party leaders like Mani (chaiwala) Shankar (neech admi) Aiyar, can head the party.

In the picture above, perhaps on a family picnic, are members of the Ghandy (wrongly changed to Gandhi) family, watching keenly the blooming of a lotus (incidentally the symbol of the now ruling Bharatiya Janata Party).

All members of the family enjoyed power – some without the corresponding responsibility, because the INC believes that only the dynasty can rule the country. No Congress worker, however senior or whatever merits, can stake a claim. Now Priyanka Vadra, sister of INC President Rahul, is being prepared for the throne in case Raul fails to make it.

This is to prevent the situation his mother faced – of ruling the country through a dummy proxy PM – being (then) inexperienced, not able to speak Hindi and an Italian.

Why the ‘miracle dog’? Because, if all others are not ready to take the PM’s post Congress may choose to install the dog in that chair

Shashi Tharoor, who held the second highest post in UN, knows huge, unpronounceable and unknown English words, and is described as “highly educated and respected” by a BJP leader, finds Rahul brilliant, capable, and the only one fit to be PM.

Sachin Pilot, educated in St. Stephens and at Wharton, both world famous, himself a part of a dynasty, feels Rahul alone can can be Congress chief and PM. His father, Raj esh Pilot died in a road accident days after calling for election to the party chief’s post.

Jyotiradtya Scindia, also from a royal dynasty, educated at Stanford Business School and Harvard, whose father died in an air rash after analysts saw him as PM material, thinks only Rahul without a degree and known for bloopers, can be a great PM.

ALL these and several other bright achievers in INC sing ‘Rahul chaalisa’ daily, praising the dynasty that partitioned India, imposed the Emergency, invaded the Golden Temple and led the Sikh genocide, because that alone can reward them with posts once INC comes to power.

And that seems a possility seeing the way BJP leaders are badmouthing Priyanka Vadra as if her entry into politics certainly means BJP’s defeat.

So, I would start praising and singing paeons of the dog before others start, because there is a possibility of Rahul being found unfit and Priyanka and her children rejecting the post. That leaves the dog.

Before others (surely) do it, I will ‘dicover’ the greatness of the canine.

Hope I will be suitably rewarded for my canine loyalty

Is This What We Fought for?

(AnAugust 2017 blog reblogged)

Relevant even on Jan 26, 2019

AS A FORERUNNER TO AUGUST 15, INDIA’S INDEPENDENCE DAY A FRIEND MAILED ME an old film song from the 1959 film Didi, sung by Asha Bhonsle, Sudha Malhotra and Mohammed Rafi.

The song, ‘Humne Suna That Ek Hai Bharat‘ (We heard that India is United’) summarises India’s recent history – its journey from a struggle for Independence marked by unique principles of non-violence and civil disobedience to dynasty rule, caste rivalry and communal disharmony, not to speak of the dirtiest politics imaginable.

How meaningful were old songs! From those soulful songs that touched hearts to today’s shouting and meaningless cacaphony of ‘lyrics’ without harmony is a similar journey of deterioration.

It was a film that starred the late Sunil Dutt. Can any reader remember the film? Or the name of the first boy on who was shown singing the song?

Veteran Journalist Kuldeep Nayar, RIP

 

Kuldeep
Veteran and most respected journalist of India, Kuldeep Nayar, RIP

VETERAN JOURNALIST KULDEEP NAYAR passed away today, at the age of 95, perhaps bringing to close with him an era of honest reporting in this age of fake and paid news.

Thousands of journalists, political leaders and  people in public life condoled his death — some of them not even knowing the names of his 15 books or his name itself. Former Shiv Sena leader and now Maharashtra Congress president Sanjay Nirupam tweeted “Veteran journalist Shri Kuldeep Nayer’s demise is a big loss to Indian journalism. He was a peace activist &  a great nationalist. Have fond memories of working with him in Rajya Sabha. Beyond The Line & India after Nehru were his most popular books. My condolences to his wife Bharti.”

Nirupam does not know that Kuldeep spelt his name as Nayar, unlike most Punjabi Nayyars and  one Punjabi who adopted the Malayalam version, Hollywood film-maker Meera Nair.

And his most famous book on (the then) current affairs was ‘Between The Lines’ not ‘Beyond The Line’ as mentioned by Nirupam, who perhaps did not read Kuldeep’s bylined column of the same name. The condoelnce served only to remind readers that he, Sanjay, was a member of Rajya Sabha.

A Pakistani daily, The Express Tribune,  distorted RIP (Requisit in Pace or Rest In Peace as commonly understood) to  ‘Rest in Power’.  Had he hankered after power, he would have cashed his job as IO  in Press Information Bureau,  later, or as Press Secretary to Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri.

Anyone who is 80 and waiting near the exit gate of life,  for it to open, is likely to read most obituaries and write on them. Sticking to my practice of writing only personal recollections when eminent people die – and not what is already in public domain or on Internet – I recall meeting him several times.

As the Editor-in-Chief  he visited  The Indian Express daily (then undivided) at an edition which I had launched as the first chief sub-editor.   Talking to him I mentioned his student days in the USA.

A close friend, the late Dr Singammal Iyengar,  told me that when she went to the USA for the second time for her doctoral studies at the Northwestern University at Evanston near Chicago, he was in the prestigious Medeil School of journalism at that university.  As a ‘senior’ she bossed over all the Indian students, helping them overcome the culture shock and teaching them expected basic behaviour.

Her contact with journalism was minimal: she thought the United News of India (UNI) news agency which he headed when she ttold me about “that boy Kuldeep”, was a part of the  United Nations!

A look at Kuldip Nayar even in his later days shows he must have been a very handsome, tall, Punjabi youth. Many girls wanted to be noticed by him and  told Dr Iyengar that he never socialised (that is, dated) and vanished after classes.

So Singammal summoned him to the canteen and asked why. He told her that as soon as “school” ended, he went to work for his pocket money. Educational loans were unheard of in India and most Indian students worked, some even in restaurents and motels. This led to a joke by Dr Laxmanswami Mudaliar (or his twin brother Dr Ramaswami), who as Vice-Chancellor at a convocation where Chester Bowles, the then famous US Ambassador in India, said in his welcome speech, “I am told in America, you give degrees for dishwashing.”

The intended pun was to say that American universities had degrees even in subjects like dishwashing, with a dig at students getting degrees after washing dishes in a restaurent.

Kuldeep was very quick on the uptake. He guessed that I was referring to the incident narrated by Dr Iyengar. He laughed it away, saying, “Oh, in those days, I had no money and had to work.” Having started his journalistic career in Urdu newspapers, he never wrote to show off his knowledge of English and even admitted wirting was not his  forte.

But humility certainly was. At least twice I took  students of the journalism departrment, as a teacher in charge of their Delhi ‘study tour’, to his house and he spent quality time with them. I remember him chiding the Head of Department for bringing the students late. “You must teach them to keep time,” he had said.

I regret that in my book on Indian journalism I wrote (as a joke, mentioning that he was a hihgly respected journbalist in India)  about Kuldeep Nayar’s  arrest by  Indira Gandhi during the Emergency.  I said someone described him as “Journalist-in-law”. He was the son-in-law of Bhimsen Sachar, the first Chief Minister of Bombay Presidency (before states were reorganised) and brother-in-law of  the late Justice Rajendra Sachar.

But then who would remember such trivia. I hope journalism students would remember at least Kuldeep Nayar

 

 

A Silly, Short Slip

MY JULY 22 POST  ‘THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT’ MUST HAVE BEEN REALLY SILLY.

One reader put a note on it, asking everyone to read, but did not reblog it. No one else commented.  I said that I wrote a short piece once because no one reads long posts. In the process I seem to have, inadvertently belittled other short blogs (“of just a few words”).

How can I write against poems? My first byline in print was for a poem. Ridicule writing short tales or on ‘prompts’? Was not  58 years of writing for print just on assignments or on what was asked? And “three line pieces” cannot be wrong. Editors keep on asking for fewer words and all through I had to keep cutting down.

Writing long, verbose pieces is easy; just pour it out.  Writing short is difficult.

People not reading? Of course, if it is worth it would be read. Lack of comments? In my book, I mention an instance of journalists in a particular city being angry with Sharad Pawar, who was then Chief Minister, for some reason. In a Press conference, after his initial remarks, there were no questions,  except to ask if it was all he wanted to say before they dispersed. An astute politician, he understood and sent an aide to all agency and newspaper offices to settle the issue.

All I can say, long or short, let us keep saying. You write to express, not for ‘like’s or comments. Or stats.

TOO LONG? SORRY.