Is This What We Fought for?

(AnAugust 2017 blog reblogged)

Relevant even on Jan 26, 2019

AS A FORERUNNER TO AUGUST 15, INDIA’S INDEPENDENCE DAY A FRIEND MAILED ME an old film song from the 1959 film Didi, sung by Asha Bhonsle, Sudha Malhotra and Mohammed Rafi.

The song, ‘Humne Suna That Ek Hai Bharat‘ (We heard that India is United’) summarises India’s recent history – its journey from a struggle for Independence marked by unique principles of non-violence and civil disobedience to dynasty rule, caste rivalry and communal disharmony, not to speak of the dirtiest politics imaginable.

How meaningful were old songs! From those soulful songs that touched hearts to today’s shouting and meaningless cacaphony of ‘lyrics’ without harmony is a similar journey of deterioration.

It was a film that starred the late Sunil Dutt. Can any reader remember the film? Or the name of the first boy on who was shown singing the song?

Veteran Journalist Kuldeep Nayar, RIP

 

Kuldeep
Veteran and most respected journalist of India, Kuldeep Nayar, RIP

VETERAN JOURNALIST KULDEEP NAYAR passed away today, at the age of 95, perhaps bringing to close with him an era of honest reporting in this age of fake and paid news.

Thousands of journalists, political leaders and  people in public life condoled his death — some of them not even knowing the names of his 15 books or his name itself. Former Shiv Sena leader and now Maharashtra Congress president Sanjay Nirupam tweeted “Veteran journalist Shri Kuldeep Nayer’s demise is a big loss to Indian journalism. He was a peace activist &  a great nationalist. Have fond memories of working with him in Rajya Sabha. Beyond The Line & India after Nehru were his most popular books. My condolences to his wife Bharti.”

Nirupam does not know that Kuldeep spelt his name as Nayar, unlike most Punjabi Nayyars and  one Punjabi who adopted the Malayalam version, Hollywood film-maker Meera Nair.

And his most famous book on (the then) current affairs was ‘Between The Lines’ not ‘Beyond The Line’ as mentioned by Nirupam, who perhaps did not read Kuldeep’s bylined column of the same name. The condoelnce served only to remind readers that he, Sanjay, was a member of Rajya Sabha.

A Pakistani daily, The Express Tribune,  distorted RIP (Requisit in Pace or Rest In Peace as commonly understood) to  ‘Rest in Power’.  Had he hankered after power, he would have cashed his job as IO  in Press Information Bureau,  later, or as Press Secretary to Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri.

Anyone who is 80 and waiting near the exit gate of life,  for it to open, is likely to read most obituaries and write on them. Sticking to my practice of writing only personal recollections when eminent people die – and not what is already in public domain or on Internet – I recall meeting him several times.

As the Editor-in-Chief  he visited  The Indian Express daily (then undivided) at an edition which I had launched as the first chief sub-editor.   Talking to him I mentioned his student days in the USA.

A close friend, the late Dr Singammal Iyengar,  told me that when she went to the USA for the second time for her doctoral studies at the Northwestern University at Evanston near Chicago, he was in the prestigious Medeil School of journalism at that university.  As a ‘senior’ she bossed over all the Indian students, helping them overcome the culture shock and teaching them expected basic behaviour.

Her contact with journalism was minimal: she thought the United News of India (UNI) news agency which he headed when she ttold me about “that boy Kuldeep”, was a part of the  United Nations!

A look at Kuldip Nayar even in his later days shows he must have been a very handsome, tall, Punjabi youth. Many girls wanted to be noticed by him and  told Dr Iyengar that he never socialised (that is, dated) and vanished after classes.

So Singammal summoned him to the canteen and asked why. He told her that as soon as “school” ended, he went to work for his pocket money. Educational loans were unheard of in India and most Indian students worked, some even in restaurents and motels. This led to a joke by Dr Laxmanswami Mudaliar (or his twin brother Dr Ramaswami), who as Vice-Chancellor at a convocation where Chester Bowles, the then famous US Ambassador in India, said in his welcome speech, “I am told in America, you give degrees for dishwashing.”

The intended pun was to say that American universities had degrees even in subjects like dishwashing, with a dig at students getting degrees after washing dishes in a restaurent.

Kuldeep was very quick on the uptake. He guessed that I was referring to the incident narrated by Dr Iyengar. He laughed it away, saying, “Oh, in those days, I had no money and had to work.” Having started his journalistic career in Urdu newspapers, he never wrote to show off his knowledge of English and even admitted wirting was not his  forte.

But humility certainly was. At least twice I took  students of the journalism departrment, as a teacher in charge of their Delhi ‘study tour’, to his house and he spent quality time with them. I remember him chiding the Head of Department for bringing the students late. “You must teach them to keep time,” he had said.

I regret that in my book on Indian journalism I wrote (as a joke, mentioning that he was a hihgly respected journbalist in India)  about Kuldeep Nayar’s  arrest by  Indira Gandhi during the Emergency.  I said someone described him as “Journalist-in-law”. He was the son-in-law of Bhimsen Sachar, the first Chief Minister of Bombay Presidency (before states were reorganised) and brother-in-law of  the late Justice Rajendra Sachar.

But then who would remember such trivia. I hope journalism students would remember at least Kuldeep Nayar

 

 

A Silly, Short Slip

MY JULY 22 POST  ‘THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT’ MUST HAVE BEEN REALLY SILLY.

One reader put a note on it, asking everyone to read, but did not reblog it. No one else commented.  I said that I wrote a short piece once because no one reads long posts. In the process I seem to have, inadvertently belittled other short blogs (“of just a few words”).

How can I write against poems? My first byline in print was for a poem. Ridicule writing short tales or on ‘prompts’? Was not  58 years of writing for print just on assignments or on what was asked? And “three line pieces” cannot be wrong. Editors keep on asking for fewer words and all through I had to keep cutting down.

Writing long, verbose pieces is easy; just pour it out.  Writing short is difficult.

People not reading? Of course, if it is worth it would be read. Lack of comments? In my book, I mention an instance of journalists in a particular city being angry with Sharad Pawar, who was then Chief Minister, for some reason. In a Press conference, after his initial remarks, there were no questions,  except to ask if it was all he wanted to say before they dispersed. An astute politician, he understood and sent an aide to all agency and newspaper offices to settle the issue.

All I can say, long or short, let us keep saying. You write to express, not for ‘like’s or comments. Or stats.

TOO LONG? SORRY.

Waning Press Freedom in India

PressProtest
 May 1 march  to Ranchi  planned  to seek Majithia Wage Board implementation

FREEDOM OF THE PRESS IN INDIA is reported to have slipped three places to the 136th place among 180 countries in the 2017 World Press Freedom Rankings, released by an international organisation ‘Reporters Without Borders‘.

India is placed three places above Pakistan and a rank below Palestine. The organisation attributed the fall to ‘rise of Hindu nationalists’, self-censorship by mainstream media and the threat of sedition charges.

Strangely, it blames ‘Hindu nationalism’ but not internationally financed  Islamic terrorism. Obviously a  ‘liberal, secular’  influence.

Whenever press freedom is mentioned, it is normal to see threats to it as coming only from the government. The present NDA government headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, is supposed to be not very close to the media. The earlier Congress government had developed a system of crony media by bestowing invisible favours on some.My Books_1

As a result, even after it imposed of the 21-month Emergency in 1975, some media still back the Congress, mostly out of hatred for ‘communal’  BJP. They are trying to bring the dynasty back to power, even by partisan reporting and interpretation, They lost their credibility in the process. Continue reading Waning Press Freedom in India